Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – A Brief Overview

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy pic
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Image: cogbtherapy.com

An experienced licensed psychologist, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., has been working with patients in Maryland for over three decades. Skilled in helping children, couples, and families, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., works to address anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other mental health issues using methods such as cognitive behavioral therapy.

Developed in the 1960s by psychiatrist Aaron Beck, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a goal-oriented psychotherapeutic treatment that helps patients explore the ways that thoughts and feelings influence their behavior. The initial goal of CBT is to help patients identify and acknowledge the patterns of thinking that are contributing to their difficulties. Then, patients can work with their therapist to reshape negative thinking and set goals toward ultimately changing the way they feel.

Although CBT is a short-term treatment method, it involves a progressive and gradual process that requires patients to play an active role in changing their behavior. In addition to participating in regular face-to-face sessions with their therapist, CBT patients are often asked to read, journal, and participate in other activities outside of therapy sessions. An effective psychotherapeutic treatment, CBT has been shown to help individuals overcome a range of issues, including phobias, addictions, and relationship problems.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D.
Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D.

Child and adolescent psychologist, Dr. Uzi Ben-Ami provides an educational program, counseling and therapy services for all ages, children and young adults, parents, and groups. His training as a cognitive behaviorist using CBT, DBT, and Future Facing Trauma Therapy, lead Dr. Uzi Ben-Ami to practice Cognitive Behavior Therapy flexibly, treating generalized anxiety, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder and trauma reactions such as PTSD, which usually involves disruptive obsessive thoughts and fearful reactions.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common presentation in therapy. OCD is usually considered a symptom of anxiety, a condition characterized by repetitive symptoms such as frequent disruptive thoughts or obsessions and/or compulsions. Sometimes, to control disruptive and disturbing thoughts, the individual reacts with repetitive behaviors that are known as compulsions. For example, with OCD, individuals may have an irrational fear that a loved one will be in an accident if they do not turn the light switch off and on four times. Occasional repetitions are considered a mild ‘superstitious behavior’ and may not necessitate intervention because they may not disrupt and disturb a person’s normal life activity or might even enhance it, such as becoming very neat and organized. However, when the behavior repeats itself in high frequency it may disturb normal life activity and may increase obsessive preoccupation which in turn may increase the frequency of compulsions or cause depression and additional anxiety. Life may become difficult to bear for the individual, and bring concerns to family, friends or colleagues. OCD may force someone who is dealing with the disorder into a stressful life. A person having fearful thoughts and compulsive rituals frequently tries unsuccessfully to ease disruptive thoughts and behaviors. It should be noted that compulsive behaviors may appear without obsessions but might become just as disruptive and difficult to bear.

Although there are different approaches to managing OCD, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is usually considered the preferred, evidence-based, research-supported intervention. With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, disruptive thoughts and behavioral patterns will be altered through supportive guidance, educational explanations, habit-reversal efforts, and by teaching how to evoke parasympathetic tension-reducing reactions. Therapeutic interventions are never cold and clinical. Therapy must always involve friendliness, hope, and a strong rapport, which must be established first before a cooperative successful intervention starts.