A Brief Overview of Viktor Frankl’s Life and Work

Viktor Frankl  pic
Viktor Frankl
Image: viktorfrankl.org

With a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, Uzi Ben-Ami has served as a licensed psychologist in Maryland for more than 30 years. Outside of his Rockville, Maryland-based practice, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., spends his free time traveling, listening to classical music, and reading. He particularly enjoys the work of Viktor Frankl.

An Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, Viktor Frankl survived the Holocaust after spending more than three years in concentration camps, during World War II. Following the war, Frankl continued his work in neurology, and psychology – much of which was related to his Holocaust experiences. he worked from 1946-70, as the director of the Vienna Neurological Policlinic. During that time, he also served as a visiting professor at several American universities, including Harvard.

A prolific writer throughout his lifetime, Frankl authored 40 books that now appear in nearly 50 languages. Much of his written work focuses on logotherapy and existential analysis, a form of psychotherapy he developed which emphasizes the role of a sense of meaning and purpose in life. One of Frankl’s last books, “Man’s Search for Meaning”, was named one of the 10 most influential books in America. Frankl is also listed with Freud and Adler as one of the most influential psychotherapists of the 20th century. Since his death in 1997, dozens of authors have published books about his life and work.

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The Papers – Spielberg’s Newest Film

Steven Spielberg pic
Steven Spielberg
Image: imdb.com

Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., applies more than 30 years of experience to his private psychology practice in Rockville, Maryland. As a trained cognitive behaviorist, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., works with individuals, couples, and families. Aside from his professional responsibilities, Dr. Ben-Ami’s hobbies include reading, photography, and watching movies, particularly films directed by Steven Spielberg.

The Papers, a new movie directed by Steven Spielberg, recently began production in New York City. Starring Oscar-winning actors Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep, the film tells the story of the Pentagon Papers, which were released to the public in 1971.

As controversy swirled around the Vietnam War, the United States Department of Defense embarked on a study of the US political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. Included in the 47-volume study was evidence of four federal administrations’ misleading of the public regarding the US involvement in Vietnam’s struggle against communism. Harry S. Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson were specifically mentioned.

Military analyst Daniel Ellsberg copied portions of the papers and gave them to the New York Times for publication. The US Department of Justice immediately obtained a temporary restraining order against the newspaper to prevent future publications in the interest of national security. The Washington Post and other national newspapers joined the New York Times in defense of the First Amendment.

Spielberg has assembled a stellar cast to bring this historic event to life on the big screen. Tom Hanks will play Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, and Meryl Streep will play the Post’s publisher Kay Graham. The film is set to be released in December 2017.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – A Brief Overview

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy pic
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Image: cogbtherapy.com

An experienced licensed psychologist, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., has been working with patients in Maryland for over three decades. Skilled in helping children, couples, and families, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., works to address anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other mental health issues using methods such as cognitive behavioral therapy.

Developed in the 1960s by psychiatrist Aaron Beck, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a goal-oriented psychotherapeutic treatment that helps patients explore the ways that thoughts and feelings influence their behavior. The initial goal of CBT is to help patients identify and acknowledge the patterns of thinking that are contributing to their difficulties. Then, patients can work with their therapist to reshape negative thinking and set goals toward ultimately changing the way they feel.

Although CBT is a short-term treatment method, it involves a progressive and gradual process that requires patients to play an active role in changing their behavior. In addition to participating in regular face-to-face sessions with their therapist, CBT patients are often asked to read, journal, and participate in other activities outside of therapy sessions. An effective psychotherapeutic treatment, CBT has been shown to help individuals overcome a range of issues, including phobias, addictions, and relationship problems.

The Commercial and Critical Success of Steven Spielberg

 

Steven Spielberg pic
Steven Spielberg
Image: imdb.com

Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., has been a psychologist in Rockville, Maryland, for more than 30 years. He has also served as the clinical director of the Center for Children’s Services in Danville, Illinois, and as a chief psychologist at the JSSA in Rockville, MD. Beyond his professional activities, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., enjoys watching the films of Steven Spielberg.

Following his 1974 directorial debut, The Sugarland Express, filmmaker Steven Spielberg released his first major motion picture, Jaws, in 1975. Jaws became one of the most successful and influential films of all time, giving birth to Hollywood’s summer blockbuster season and launching Spielberg on one of the most decorated career paths the industry has ever seen.

Financially speaking, Spielberg’s second-most successful effort as a director came in 1982 with ET: The Extra Terrestrial. ET grossed more than $435 million in the United States and nearly $358 million internationally, for a total gross of approximately $793 million. In 1993, Spielberg’s Jurassic Park fell just shy of ET’s domestic mark at $402 million, but impressed foreign audiences to the tune of $626 million, bringing Spielberg his first and only $1 billion film.

As a director, Spielberg has excelled with dramatic pictures in addition to his long list of summer blockbusters. He has received seven Academy Award nominations for directing, with wins for Schindler’s List in 1994 and Saving Private Ryan in 1999, and was nominated nine other times, winning twice for Best Picture. Spielberg has also seen success at ceremonies such as the Golden Globes and the Directors Guild of America Awards, among countless others.

A Brief Introduction to the Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder pic
Bipolar Disorder
Image: webmd.com

Since earning a Ph.D. and licensed as a psychologist following a graduate program at the University of Maryland, College Park, Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D. has spent more than three decades providing psychological support to individuals throughout the Rockville area. Uzi Ben-Ami, Ph.D., treats clients for a number of psychological issues, including trauma-related stress and reactions, PTSD, and bipolar disorder.

Bipolar disorder is primarily a disorder involving Depression, a psychological condition that is characterized also by excessive mood swings or at least a single manic episode. It is usually known to the public as excessive mood swings disorder that carries an individual from the lows of clinical depression to the extreme highs of mania. However, many of Bipolar patients do not suffer from the mood swings on a regular basis or even frequently, showing instead mostly symptoms of depression. Because of the mood swing aspect, the disorder was previously known best as manic-depressive illness. However, we now recognize that episodes of unexplained or confused elation could also be a sign of the disorder even without frank mania. Untreated bipolar disorder can result in erratic, sometimes psychotic or dangerous behavior, sometimes leading to suicidal tendencies and frequently to major disturbances in social, family and work situations.

It is best to treat bipolar disorder medically and psychologically as soon as possible. Individuals with a mild form of the disorder, called Hypomania, should, therefore, remain vigilant for the advancing symptoms of the disorder. Common symptoms of bipolar depression range from long episodes of crying to suicidal ideation. Physical clues may also include insomnia and oversleeping, low energy levels, fatigue, and changes in appetite or strong agitation, mild depressing hallucination, and delusions.

Mania is most commonly signaled by periods of euphoria and impulsive, selfish disorganized gratification seeking behavior, such as a need for constant stimulation, travel, gambling, promiscuity. Manic episodes are usually very unsettling for the family and the individual. A manic individual can become irritated and angry, or may behave like a hungry addict, not only for drugs, and may report beautiful hallucinations and delusions, flashing colors or ‘visions’. It should also be noted that individuals dealing with bipolar disorder may struggle with depression and mania at the same time. As the reader might have noted, extreme symptoms might be classified as psychotic.